The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

Long-Unused Courtyard to Finally Reopen as a Community Space
Long-Unused Courtyard to Finally Reopen as a Community Space
Annie Hubert, Guest Writer • April 13, 2024

Riddled with cracked cement and overgrown weeds, the courtyard that lies between Grewen and Reilly halls has been left untouched by the Le Moyne...

‘It Felt Like a Gift From God’: Le Moyne Students and Surrounding Community React to Eclipse
‘It Felt Like a Gift From God’: Le Moyne Students and Surrounding Community React to Eclipse
CMM-274 Class, Guest Writers • April 11, 2024

Amanda Wood started her day off in a taciturn mood at Le Moyne College, underwhelmed by all the talk of the big event. Monday was just any other...

Le Moyne College Responds to Surge in Campus Car Break-ins
Le Moyne College Responds to Surge in Campus Car Break-ins
La Quida Cummings, Guest Writer • April 10, 2024

In response to a recent series of car break-ins across campus, Derek McGork, director of Security, used a recent interview with The Dolphin to...

Spotlight: Cellist Jordan Gunns Musical Journey
Spotlight: Cellist Jordan Gunn's Musical Journey
Daniel Mondelli April 9, 2024

This Wednesday, April 10th, Le Moyne will host a performance by cellist Jordan Gunn in the Panasci Family Chapel at 7:30 pm and will be accompanied...

Flags and Acknowledgements: Le Moyne Takes Steps Toward Reconciliation with the Haudenosaunee
Flags and Acknowledgements: Le Moyne Takes Steps Toward Reconciliation with the Haudenosaunee
Isabella Allen and Carly Nicolai April 5, 2024

“We honor the Onondaga Nation, the original people on whose land Le Moyne College stands.” You may have heard this recited at school-sponsored...

Four Years Later: The Covid Redux

via+the+Wellness+Center
via the Wellness Center

Four years ago, after the pandemic began in March 2020, the Le Moyne College campus was soon without students attending classes. COVID-19 had forced the college into remote learning for the spring semester. The following year required schedule changes, delays, masking and remote learning, due to the spread of the virus.

Today, the impact of COVID on the Le Moyne campus still lingers, but is much more mild. The federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have relaxed virtually all of their guidelines. While the virus still exists, it has not created nearly as much panic and havoc as it has in previous years.

In recent weeks, The Washington Post reported that the CDC will soon relax its guidelines to allow Americans who are positive to be allowed to mingle in public, providing they are at least 24 hours beyond running a fever or other major symptoms – which could change current policies at Le Moyne about staying away from class and fellow students for at least five days, after testing positive.

“We will adapt to whatever the CDC guidelines suggest,” said Robin Gara, nurse manager of the school’s wellness center.

Gara said the wellness center has seen only 37  COVID cases since the start of the semester, one of the lowest it's been since the start of the pandemic. Although COVID is on the decline, Gara warns that students should still remain vigilant. She recommends students and faculty exercise open communication with one another.

“If someone is showing any symptoms, ask them if they’ve tested, and if you’re presenting symptoms, then be proactive and test for the safety of others,” Gara said. She also suggests frequent hand washing, wearing a mask around those who are sick, and firmly recommends staying up to date on the vaccine and its boosters.

COVID still strikes students and faculty without warning. Professor Fred Glennon, former chair of religious studies, is an example.  “I tested positive at the end of last semester. I think the Le Moyne Christmas party for staff and faculty was a super spreader,” Glennon said. “Last fall, 20 students had to be quarantined in my classes because of COVID,” he added.

One student in this spring semester has just recovered from testing positive for the virus. Junior Isabella Allen had spent time with her sister, who tested positive a few hours later. Isabella quarantined for a full five days, then distanced herself for five more days to ensure she did not pass the virus on to others.

“I started with a fairly intense sore throat and gradually some sinus pressure. I had a few low-grade fevers and migraines. The worst symptom was drowsiness,” said Isabella. “I would get tired from doing very minor things. All of my energy would be used up by simply showering or getting up to grab something.”

Nurse Gara claims that the symptoms from COVID have changed over the years along with varying strains of the virus. “Early on we saw a loss of taste and smell, now we’re seeing a lot more congestion, sore throats, and drowsiness. Even abdominal issues such as nausea and vomiting.”

While the symptoms have transformed from what the world was seeing in 2020, Gara says that the majority of those with COVID seem to be less sick than those at the start of the pandemic.

SIDEBAR
Suggestions for students who have recently tested positive COVID from Nurse Gara at Le Moyne’s Wellness Center:

  • Students who are able should go home to isolate for a minimum of five days.
    • Those who are unable to return home may isolate in St. Mary’s dormitory.
  • Communicate with professors in order to facilitate a workload and determine deadlines as
    applicable.
  • Students isolating in St. Mary’s:
    • An email from the wellness center will be sent out to those who are positive, in
      that email there will be a QR code to order meals from dining services.
    • Students may pick up meals at an outdoor location provided by dining services.
    • Those in need of cold medication can utilize mobile ordering delivery apps (like
      instacart) to purchase medication from local pharmacies.
    • Students may not leave their isolation space unless there are emergency
      circumstances.
    • The only case in which it is okay to leave is for medical care and getting food, but
      even in this case students are advised to wear a N95, K95, or surgical mask.
  • After the five-day isolation period, if students feel their symptoms are improving they
    may return to campus but must wear a mask at all times until 10 days after testing
    positive.
  • Students may enter the dining hall for meals but must retreat back to their dorms for
    consumption.
  • Gara suggests students monitor their symptoms and treat them accordingly.
  • If symptoms worsen, students should contact their primary care physician for additional
    care.
  • Students should stay up to date on their vaccinations and booster shots.
  • Gara also advises students and faculty to stay up to date on their flu shots as well.
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