The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

The Unlikely Journey that Led to Jenicah Brown’s Historic Goal
The Unlikely Journey that Led to Jenicah Brown’s Historic Goal
Stephen Riale, Guest Writer • February 26, 2024

“I think that every athlete at one point or another dreams of playing at the Division 1 level,” Le Moyne College women’s soccer star Jenicah...

Coach Liz Beville, courtesy of Greg Wall, Le Moyne Athletics
Lacrosse Progams Zero in on D-I Challenge
Stephen Moore and Aidan Clark February 26, 2024

With the inaugural Division I season approaching for Le Moyne College’s lacrosse program, the Dolphins look to make waves at the D-I level...

The Dolphin Goes Offline: Copyright Issues Force Paper to Remove Majority of Articles
The Dolphin Goes Offline: Copyright Issues Force Paper to Remove Majority of Articles
Isabella Allen, Staff Writer • February 26, 2024

The Dolphin has been a staple of Le Moyne college for many years, giving journalism students an avenue to learn and practice news writing before...

photo courtesy of I Love NY
Le Moyne Events Shaping for Eclipse
Aidan Mingoia and Legende McGrath February 26, 2024

Le Moyne College, in preparation for the once-in-a-lifetime celestial event that will occur in just over a month, will be hosting a myriad of...

Award Show Snubs: The Grammys, NFL Honors, and the Oscars
Award Show Snubs: The Grammys, NFL Honors, and the Oscars
Michael Scalise, Staff Writer • February 24, 2024

We are at the start of award show season, and with any sort of award comes controversy as to whether it was deservingly granted. Or, more importantly,...

A Total Eclipse of the Sun: Le Moyne and the April Solar Eclipse

the+sun+over+Le+Moyne
Le Moyne College
the sun over Le Moyne

On April 8, a Monday, a total solar eclipse will turn day to night in a matter of minutes in midafternoon above the Le Moyne College campus.

For the first time in basically a century – and for the first time ever at Le Moyne, founded in 1946 – such an eclipse will be visible in Central New York.

The sky will grow so dark, astronomical experts say, that planets will emerge in what looks an evening sky. Segments of piercing light will appear around the corona of the darkened sun. Confused animals will react as if the night’s arrived far too early.

Hundreds of thousands of people from around the world, if not more, will converge on Western and Central New York to see this once in a lifetime phenomenon.

“It’s just amazing. It’s hard to describe,” said Michael Humphrey, president of the Buffalo Astronomical Association, who paid a Zoom visit recently to a Le Moyne communications class – and said the eclipse becomes even more pronounced as you move closer to the center line, which runs directly through Buffalo.

While Le Moyne is not on the absolute center line, the college still falls within the “path of totality” – a 100-mile-wide stripe from Mexico to Maine in which the full eclipse will be visible. Totality – meaning the sun is completely eclipsed by the moon – will occur around 3:20 p.m. on April 8 in Syracuse, and will last about a minute.

In a question of particular interest to students hoping to witness the moment, classes will not be canceled – but faculty will be “encouraged” to somehow incorporate the historic eclipse into their lesson plans for that day, according to Joseph Della Posta, college communications director.

Additionally, the school will offer at least four events celebrating the unprecedented day. There will be a noon picnic at which special eclipse glasses will be distributed, because of the risk to the human eyes if one observes the eclipse without proper eye protection.

Another event will feature Jason Luscier, associate professor of biological and environmental sciences, leading a walk through a wooded area to see how animals in the wild will react to the eclipse. The eclipse itself will be followed by a 5 p.m. lecture by a physics professor from Syracuse University, offering addition explanation of the phenomenon just witnessed at campus.

Finally, at the picnic, students in dance choreography will present short dances based on research involving the connection between dance and solar eclipses, according to a student from the choreography class.

This piece was researched and written by students from Communications 374-01, a newswriting class: Isabella Allen, Corinne Becker, Camille Chun, Aidan Clark, La Quida Cummings, Payton Hirsch, Annie Hubert, Jonathan Marks, Legende McGrath, Aidan Mingoia, Stephen Moore, Nicholas Nevins, Carly Nicolai, Joseph Pezzimenti, Stephen Riale, Claire Rickett, Kamilla Shahzad, Steele Williams and Mary Anne Winfield.

More to Discover
Social Media Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com