A Review of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew

A+Review+of+Shakespeare%27s+Taming+of+the+Shrew

This weekend is the final weekend to see Taming of the Shrew at the Performing Arts Center on campus. One of Shakespeare’s most controversial classics, Shrew is not one for the timid director. However, Matt Chiorini and the entire cast and crew do such a phenomenal job with this production that anyone would love this play. Although some lines may be questionable to the modern feminist, the delivery of those lines, and the development of the characters, make up for it.

By intermission the audience was in tears laughing. Flowers, a wedding, a demonic “shrew”, and a kidnapping all in the first half! Make sure you bring your $20, there’s a kissing booth at intermission, with one of the handsome actors walking around asking for donations.

Many people underestimate the importance of delivery in a play. However, that importance cannot be ignored in a production such as this. The acting was complex, especially for those playing multiple roles. Everyone pulled it off flawlessly, most especially Tom Vasquez, who had everyone laughing from the moment he stepped on stage. Were it not for the excellent acting of the entire cast [most especially Marisa Valent and Fred Pienkoski] this production could have easily fallen prey to its name and reputation: just a misogynistic piece of junk that has no place in modern society.

Valent married language and physical cues perfectly to convey a much deeper subtext than her words portrayed. Pienkoski, in turn, was able to play almost an entire scene without saying a single word.

From a technical aspect, the production isn’t as jaw dropping as say, Pericles [from last fall], but the acting really stood out. It was apparent that all the actors were really happy to be a part of the production, and they more than proved they earned their roles with their sheer talent and determination.

Everything from costumes, to the set, to the music, to the lights, was incredible. I give the highest commendations to the director Matt Chiorini, stage manager Carrie Bates, and the entire cast and crew.

There is a $1/ticket tonight at 8pm, and if you can’t make it tonight there are still performances tomorrow at 8pm and Saturday at 2pm and 8pm.