The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

The student-run news site of Le Moyne College.

The Dolphin

Navigating College Stress: Effective Strategies and Le Moyne Resources for Student Well-being
Mai Aljanabi, Staff Writer • September 27, 2023

College life presents unique challenges and stressors for students, impacting their mental well-being and overall success. This article delves...

via The Huntington
Persistence Into Brilliance: Le Moyne Graduate and Actor Makes Major Mark
Kamilla Shahzad, Staff Writer • September 26, 2023

In the world of theater, Le Moyne College graduate John Douglas Thompson is known to possess an exceptional ability to captivate audiences, effortlessly...

via newbaseballmedia.com
Le Moyne Alum and MLB Star Josiah Gray Nominated for Roberto Clemente Award
Michael Scalise, Staff Writer • September 25, 2023

Here at Le Moyne, the phrase “Greatness meets Goodness” is at the very foundation by which the school stands, and it is safe to say that...

Career Advising & Development at Le Moyne
Career Advising & Development at Le Moyne
Carly Nicolai, Editor in Chief • September 18, 2023

“What do you want to do with your degree?” It’s a question many college students have heard before, whether it comes from friends and...

Growing Sunshine-Colored Flowers: Remembering Father Bosch
Growing Sunshine-Colored Flowers: Remembering Father Bosch
Stephanie R. Duscher, Staff Writer • September 16, 2023

Many Le Moyne students have likely walked by the lovely gardens outside the Jesuit Residence–a beautiful touch of color amidst the many cloudy...

“The Muppets” return, bigger and better than ever

“The Muppets” return, bigger and better than ever

“It’s time to play the music
It’s time to light the lights
It’s time to meet the Muppets
On the Muppet Show tonight.”
After a 12-year absence from the big screen (somewhat made up for with the occasional TV special and YouTube video), Jim Henson’s beloved Muppets are back with the help of names like Jason Segel and Nicholas Stoller.
Segel and Stoller, who previously collaborated on “Forgetting Sarah Marshall,” are credited as co-writers for “The Muppets” and the project is obviously a labor of love for them. Joy and adoration for these characters seems to be seeping out of the corners of every frame throughout the film’s two-hour duration.
“The Muppets” is told from the point of view of Walter, a Muppet-like character who himself is the epitome of every Muppet fan in the universe. Walter has spent much of his life obsessing over “The Muppet Show” with his human brother Gary (Segel). His chance to finally meet the cast comes when Gary invites Walter to join him and his girlfriend, Mary (Amy Adams), on a trip to Los Angeles for their 10th anniversary.
But it turns out times have changed and the Muppets have since gone their separate ways. A trip to the famous Muppet Theater reveals an old, abandoned dump that oil tycoon Tex Richman (Chris Cooper) is planning to demolish so he can drill for oil underneath. Walter, devastated by the news, rounds up the old gang to put on one last show to save the theater. Meanwhile, Mary is worried Gary’s loyalty to his brother is putting the brakes on their own relationship.
What follows is one of the funniest movies in a year of half-hearted attempts at comedy; nearly every scene is packed with dozens of jokes. Apart from a few too many stabs at modern pop culture (a chicken rendition of Cee Lo Green’s “Forget You” goes on for far too long), most of them work.
Much of the humor derives from simple nostalgia for these characters and the decades in which they thrived. Kermit the Frog’s butler, for example, is a robot that can only communicate in ‘80s slang and irritating dial-up sounds. And it wouldn’t be a Muppet movie without some “traveling by map.”
As noted before, Segel, as lead actor and co-writer, clearly has a passion for the Muppets. Both he and Adams are spot-on as the plucky human protagonists. Cooper fittingly hams it up as the baddie while Rashida Jones holds her own as a television executive.
Segel and Stoller essentially envisioned this as a follow-up to “The Muppet Show” and the early Muppet movies. As such, there are hundreds upon hundreds of celebrity cameos, some of which make for great moments (e.g. Zack Galifianakis as a homeless audience member) while others fall flat (as a waitress, Sarah Silverman has exactly one drab line). Credit must also be given to Bret McKenzie for his wonderfully catchy musical numbers including “Life’s a Happy Song” and “Man or Muppet.”
Not surprisingly, though, the standouts are, of course, the Muppets themselves. Some may lament a lack of ‘90s favorite Rizzo the Rat, but the rest of the characters haven’t changed a bit. Even Animal, who is found at an anger-management clinic, realizes he can’t leave the drums forever.
Though the original 1979 “Muppet Movie” remains the best of the film series, Segel and Stoller’s love letter comes in at a very close second thanks to strong writing, terrific songs and their persistence to stay true to these endearing characters.

4 out of 5 Dolphins

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